Tuesday, April 17, 2018

your turn #10

 armin hoffman, poster for stadt theater basel, 1963

We've covered propaganda, advertising, WWII (their side, ours), Alvin Lustig, the International Typographic Swiss Style (with the likes of Müller-Brockmann, Max Huber, Eric Nitsche & Armin Hoffman), Helvetica, & the emergence of the "pre logo" artists (Bass, Giusti, Stankowski, et. al.).

go ahead!

7 comments:

Kim Diaz said...

Last week I was enthused to learn about the Swiss typographic style because that style of design is everywhere. It’s very simple and minimalistic but it contains enough information to get its message across and keep the viewer interested. I think it is interesting how within the design, once you start thinking about the possible ways they could have been approached, the use of the grid is extremely obvious. In my typography class we once had to recreate grids and use them in designing a magazine spread and I remember how intricate the Swiss grid was; there were rows and columns everywhere giving you a large number of possibilities in terms of laying out a design. Another thing I found interesting about this movement is the use of Helvetica; it’s such a clean, simple typeface that can be both attention grabbing and subtle and it is still one of the most popular typefaces to date.

Sondra Pearson said...

I enjoyed our discussion this week, especially the part about Swiss typographic size. The simplicity and attention to detail is what attracts me the most. Bold, impactful colors and spatial awareness are key. I also loved how the type was the most important part of the design; how it’s the meat of the sandwich, per se. Sans serif fonts are my favorite, as well, so this entire movement is heaven for a person like me.

One interesting thing I noticed is that most of the prominent designers we’ve discussed thus far are men. In my other classes, we have talked about Saul Bass and other designers like Massimo Vignelli and Mucha, but I just learned about Cipe Pineles last week in this class. I've seen her designs before, but never knew her name. My other class emphasized men and rarely talked about the women. I know that back then, men were the ones who mostly worked in this field, so that explains the lack of female designers. Nowadays, my graphic design, advertising, and art classes are full of women with only a few male classmates. Perhaps this is because of an emphasis on STEM careers and the tech boom, or because even though there are fewer men they are more likely to be bosses in these fields? I’m not sure. But I wish more women were art directors and heads of advertising agencies today. Anyway, I just found that interesting.

Estella M. said...

Last week, two areas had the most impact on me. The first was the propaganda and the differences between the soft-core propaganda of the US and the hard-core propaganda of the Hitler Regime. The simplicity of the graphics, repetition of message and the simplification of phrasing is what makes people buy into the persuasive messages. The ideals behind them are what make the difference behind the end results. Hate vs coming together as a nation to do what's right, supremacy vs pride, evil vs good; these are all themes that were prominent in the propaganda.

The pre-logo artists was the other area which had an impact. Again, simplicity and repetition are key design elements which drove the movement. So it seems that it would be a natural progression to go from these two areas to logos and corporate identity in graphic design. It is the simplistic and repeated visual mark the defines a corporation's identity.

Ryan Deering said...

I found the concept of the pre-logo intriguing, especially the way CBS was able to evolve it over time. In contemporary times a company's logo is one of the most important aspects of its identity, most people's associations with any sort of capitalist enterprise beginning primarily with their logo. The pre-logo appears, at least in my eyes, to be a natural evolution to come out of traditional advertising methods that appeared to focus less on what the company or product represented. Drawing the idea of the logo back to the ideogram shows how this is done, the pre-logo being combinations of ideograms to present a central idea.

Michael Haring said...

One of the most impactful conversations from last class was about Anton Stankowski. His design work felt truly revolutionary to me with his meta-conception of implied, underlying meaning presented through the simplest of forms and lines. The construction of his design work creates palpable action and movement to form a both complex and simplistic experience, undoubtedly revolutionizing how people ingest and perceive graphics, leading to the development of logos/symbols of universal recognition.

Another artist from last class who impacted me is Alvin Lustig. For someone with such a short lifetime, his breadth of work is both immense and astonishing. His architecture and interior design work defies tradition through fluidity and simplicity incorporating unique angles, woodworking and light fixtures. His book covers are especially interesting, similar in abstraction and meta conception to Stankowski. His limited color palette and use of negative space creates severity while his fluid line work and imagery adds lightness and whimsy akin to Picasso's style.

Sara Punal said...

From last week's lecture, I greatly appreciated the discussion on Saul Bass' work in typography in film. I loved his title sequence work in Cape Fear, Vertigo, and Psycho. After class I actually rewatched Psycho and was stunned by the incredible line work and composition of his typography. The title sequence in film is such a vital part to the film's initial intrigue to the viewer. Bass does an excellent job of blending creativity in his craft with the message of the film that the title sequence is substantial enough to be it's own work within a greater work (the film itself).

Denise O. said...

Since the first time we saw politically related graphic design images, I have been intrigued by propaganda and the messages within these visuals. From this week specifically, World War II propaganda was intriguing. From the iconic , “We can do it!” poster, to the more abstract representation that Thomas Hart Benton created in NARA Picture Branch, propaganda is interesting to analyze. There is a sense of using minimal words, simple layout, repetition of messages through text and visuals, alongside the half-truths the public is exposed to. Furthermore, the differences between choosing to include famous, recognizable figures versus using animals such as snakes are all deliberate choices to evoke emotion, create a reaction. Propaganda is not only subliminally powerful to those exposed to it at the time, but the ones that usually strike the most controversy, and strong emotion, are the ones that stick with someone the most. In addition, Joseph Goebbels’ comment, “Political propaganda in principle is active and revolutionary.” carries a lot of significance in defining the invention of this type of publications. The manipulation of beliefs, attitudes or actions through symbols shows how powerful an artists’ “mark” can be at the end of the day.