Friday, April 8, 2011

Your turn #8

32 comments:

Alyssa Alvarez said...

I really enjoyed our discussion on the logos. I myself have a fascination with logos, and though I do not enjoy designing them personally, I love seeing logos of companies and discerning how they were trying to represent themselves to others. Our discussion about the rise and fall of logos, and how a company can not just change its logo reminded me of a recent attempt at this. Not too long ago, GAP attempted to change their from the well known blue square/helvetica type to something drastically 90s. after public ridicule and outcry, the company then decided to revert back to their known logo before too much damage was done.

-Alyssa Alvarez

Elizabeth said...

Elizabeth Brasch
In composing my comment for this weeks lecture, I first offer a confession: I love to watch the Olympics. This love is coming from someone who normally strongly objects to the lure of television and its inevitable waste of time and mute of real thought. I often wonder to myself, what is it about the Olympics that is so alluring to me? Through some reflection and small research, I have realized that it is not really the sports themselves that are so incredibly enticing, but rather the muscled, lithe, and extremely toned bodies that participate in the sports. If you compare Olympic athletes and their physical appearances today with those of say 50 years ago, a difference in mass and strength is obvious. For example, female gymnasts today seem more compact and muscular than ever before in history. Many scientists theororize that the reason for the ‘pump-up’ of Olympic bodies is largely a result of an increase in nutritional knowledge, more technologically intricate training, and simply more evolved coaching skills. I do not deny that these reasons do in fact intensely effect the increase in athlete muscle mass. However, I believe one important factor is missing here; the impact of photography and constantly available images (most of which are often altered via some form of Photoshop). With our technological ability to make the beautiful even more awe-inspiring and the muscular even more cut, our ideas about bodily cultural norms change. Olympic athletes are those who strive to be the best, the most ideal, yet often the most extreme. And with an increase in overall standards of what it means to be physically fit, athletes everywhere are training to maintain the increase in ‘athletic appeal/standard. Our ability to enhance one’s image in a photograph, combated with the learned human desire to attain perfection, has forever altered ideal athletic standards.
Elizabeth Brasch

Nicole Ann Collazo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nicole Ann Collazo said...

One of the topics I found interesting was logos. I find it interesting how a logo, no matter how simple, becomes recognizable to almost everyone. A person may not know what a company is or what the product is they sell, but they will recognize their names based on seeing their logos.I love how the process to create something so simple has so much thought that has to be put into it, everything from the font to the colors.

I remember learning in high school how if you look at a number of fast food chains and also restaurants, many of them incorporate yellow and red into their designs. This is because these colors have been found to make people think they are hungry, in the end attracting more customers. I find it amazing how long some logos have been around having had little or no changes done to them. I'm not sure if I agree with the change towards "more is the new less" because I still feel that simplicity often achieves better results.

-Nicole Collazo

Anonymous said...

I also find logos very interesting. It is curious how a little design can become a companies persona. Even if the design of the logo has nothing to do with what the company has to offer, it is still immediately recognizable. That also goes to show how important it is for the design of the logo itself to be perfect. When I was given the task of making a logo for my own website, I too had to follow the guidelines as to what makes a good logo such as its effectiveness in color and black and white, how it looks when placed on the product, how it looks in different sizes etc. and it is no easy task. For the designers of the companies whose logos you see hundreds of time on a daily basis to be so easily recognizable really says something about their expertise in design, even more so when a logo is still standing strong after so many years.

-Eduardo Prieto

Anonymous said...

2x4’s approach to design, how they use technology and there platform of operating really impressed me. Their design for Contemporary innovation at the National design museum is a striking example of Graphic design, sculpture and installation. 2x4 is a perfect example of how we can use technology to create practically anything we can think of and do so, in a timely fashion that keeps up with speed of global business. In the case of 2x4 it is their application’s they perform with Macintosh computers. This design firm truly uses technology to its full capabilities and can compete globally and domestically at the same time, while still being extremely creative and productive.2x4 among many other firms (I am sure) that are working at a pace where the technology and ideas are at the same level and that is what is so exciting for me. Not to mention the founders and partners all came from a printmaking background….go printmaking!.

Thomas Engleman.

Nicole Brener said...

I've always found the art of creating a logo very interesting. Creating a mark that represents a unity of things is more work than it seems, it implies condensing a ton of information into one simple design that becomes the identity of a company or individual. If we look back in time, logos reflect historical movements and styles such as minimalism. Simple, clean, and straight to the point logo designs that have lasted in time. However, if we take a look at today's logo designs, we can see that the minimalistic trend is slowly fading away, and designs are going in the opposite direction, using texture, pictograms, bright colors, and even 3D design. In my opinion, I love change and few rules when it comes to art and design; my only concern is that the design doesn’t interfere with the message or readability of the logo.

-Nicole Brener

Laura Greenberg said...

I loved George Lois' work, and am amazed and embarrassed that I never heard of him before this class. He has been so influential in American ad campaigns, contributing to the "I Want My MTV" campaign, naming Lean Cuisine's, doing campaigns for Tommy Hilfiger, and even four US Senators. I like his use of humor in the Esquire covers, especially the Andy Warhol tomato soup can cover. He had a very good understanding of pop culture and how to exploit it to his advantage. Lois was very adamant about the role of art in advertising, saying "Advertising is so far from a science it's not even funny...advertising is an art." I think this is a true, but advertising must also include some science to be successful. The designer has to know his market and have some understanding of psychology to fully understand how to make a product appealing. However, I do agree that art is the driving force behind successful ad campaigns. No matter how fully a designer understands the science behind a product market, if they can't translate that into a dynamic, engaging ad, the campaign will not work. It is the marriage between science and art that makes advertising so influential and irresistible, and ultimately motivates you to go buy that bottle of Coke.

Dan Arrojo said...

I personally found the isometric pixel artwork from eBOY to be the most fascinating mostly because it was a personal interest of mine at a younger age and I used to experiment with it. I think what I find most appealing is the intricacy and detail of the work which is not unlike a tapestry.

There is an interesting dichotomy between simplicity and detail in these pieces, as many of the textures and detail are deceptively simple on a close-up level, but form a larger image from a distance. There have been artists like Salvador Dali (in his work Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at Twenty Meters becomes a Portrait of Abraham Lincoln) and Georges Seurat (in his work A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte) who in essence had invented the pixel before the pixel, and like mentioned earlier intricate tapestries and weavings from all cultures ranging from Europe, to the Middle East, and Asia that use small detail to form a larger image.

It is therefore my conclusion that the pixel is just our present day manifestation of these past themes and movements like pointillism, weaving, et cetera.

www.authenticsociety.com/img/Dali.Gala.Lincoln.20meters.jpg

http://blogs.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/Georges_Seurat_-_Un_dimanche_apr%C3%A8s-midi_%C3%A0_l%27%C3%8Ele_de_la_Grande_Jatte.jpg

SoFlSunrise said...

I really liked the posters by Studio Dumbar. The images are refreshingly imperfect. The blurred photo gives it movement and mystery. The clustered text has a sense of wind like movement over the image versus the usual gravitated balanced words. These unusual techniques appear edgy and playful. The images make me feel mildly uncomfortable, but not to the point that it is too chaotic or unlikeable. In class critiques, my professors and the students often praise designs that appear to use a grid, or have perfectly spaced gutters, with plenty of open space. I understand this makes people comfortable and is the current trend. Yet I have a lot of respect for designers who break the rules, not to rebel, but to do so for expanding the idea of what can be good design.

- Michelle Roy

Anonymous said...

I loved looking at all of the logos we saw in class. It's amazing the difference a logo can make for a company, place, person, etc. Even if it's just a few simple lines, or a pair of initials, some logos become universally known and recognized by just about everyone. It's interesting to see the evolution of some logos, like Nike, and what changes were made over time, even if they were slight changes. They keep up with the design trends of time- now, Nike's logo is just the swoosh symbol, and it's really clean. It's amazing how Paul Rand created so many logos that are still used today- it shows that if a logo works and becomes the face of a company, then it's hard to re-design it. It would only confuse the consumers and take away a familiarity from them.

Here's a short film that was made using only corporate logos... it's pretty cool to see how we recognize all of them-

http://vimeo.com/12026956


-Kate Festa

Ernesto Ramirez said...

The Post Typography by Nolen Strals and Bruce Willen really caught my eye. I’m currently taking a typography class and to be honest before this class I never really viewed typography as an art form in itself. What Post Typography does really intrigues me because they take words and create images in a modern way. Hey don’t really abide by too many rules which is great, looking at their works it really feels like a breath of fresh air. The great part about it is words present no boundaries. You need words in order to communicate and what Post Typography does is it takes typography and combines it with illustrations in a way in which at first you don’t really notice what you’re looking at. But once you notice the typography and how it relates to the illustration you can see the art that Post Typography creates. In their website under their portfolio, one of my favorite works that they did is called Dirty Minds. Here is the link to the work and it basically shows how Post Typography combines what they’re trying to say to the illustration as well as the title.

Carolina said...

The topic that interested me the most, even though it was brief topic was Poster Boy. When we briefly touched upon the subject, I immediately thought that I have to find a way to combine him some way in the paper I was writing for my other art history class. Sure enough when I started doing some research I found a link; he too did some art work that focused on Obama. Not much is known about Poster Boy but what is known is that he attended a community college and later an art school but he dropped out. While in school he was influenced by the works of Noam Chomsky, Lao Tzu, and George Orwell’s “1984”. He is well known for his collage-like works, which are created by cutting out different sections of the advertisement posters that are in subway station platforms, and pasting them back in different positions. I just find the whole street artist movement entertaining.
- Carolina Fernandez

Anonymous said...

I really enjoyed our discussion last week on logos. It opened my eyes to the importance of how perfect the logo must be designed in order to summarize the essence of the company. I particularly enjoyed learning about the first logos created, especially the CBS logo. This is one of my favorite logos because it is amazing how the first design absolutely captured the essence of the television station at that moment in time. The CBS design raises a few very important ideas regarding successful logos such simplicity, accessibility, and brand recognition. I think it is so interesting to study logos in the 80s, compared to the logos of today because they have not changed very much over the years. I believe that the most successful logos are the simplest designs and representative of the brand. For example, JC Penny changed their logo recently because they are trying to change the understanding of their brand. The focus of the new logo is only on the letters ‘JCP’ instead of the entire word JC Penny, which many people recognize as outdated. This new logo gives a fresh new perception of the store that is currently trying to become more stylish and fashionable.

Lara Rosenbaum

Lisa said...

I was most drawn to George Lois’s work in last week’s lecture. The way he took risks in his art direction was really inspiring. He found a way to bring humor and creativity to each cover and illustration he was a part of. His Campbell’s Soup parody of Andy Warhol is a perfect example of the way he took an artist or person and that person's body of work and used those two components to create a groundbreaking design idea that was unique to his own style. I believe his work for Esquire really set the bar high for art direction and proved that creatives could indeed control a publication, just as Lois himself believed. Without his control and creative direction, I don’t think the magazine would have become as well-known as it is today.

-Lisa Trucchio

Amanda Zacharkiewicz said...

I was especially interested in the segment about posters as a political medium. I found it extremely topical as I had recently been exploring a collection of posters to promote aid for Japan in the wake of last month's earthquake (www.designerterminal.com/inspiration/illustration/pray-for-japan-inspiring-beautiful-illustrations.html). It's so clever the way these artists have incorporated the Japanese flag into their designs, exemplifying the power of universal symbols. Many of the posters get their messages across without even using text. The designs are truly inspiring.

Anonymous said...

As many people mentioned, there are a lot of standards involved when it comes to creating a solid logo. It has to be unique to the company or product, as well as clear and recognizable.
I personally love what I consider "smart logos" -- logos that contain hidden symbols and meaning behind them. These logos, such as the one for the Milwaukee Brewers, are more appealing because they cause you to think about, absorb and dissect the logo, which also results in excitement once you figure it out. Logos which are more thought out and hold hidden symbolism can also be more impactful when describing the product/company and what it stands for.
However, I think one should keep things simple, straightforward, clear and concise when designing a logo if they are unable to develop one with hidden symbolism. Trying too hard and being untrue to the company may only end up with your logo landing on one of those "worst logo's ever" lists. If you have a great idea roll with it, just be sure not to push something that isn't there.

- alexandra goldman

Ashley said...

After looking at some of Deborah Sussman’s work in class I was intrigued to learn more about her and other notable projects she created. Her array of projects are so inspiring being that they all stem from graphic design however they incorporate so many other fields as well including architecture, entertainment, culture, and communities. She brings such variety and creativeness to corporate businesses and it’s incredible how far her work spans from transportation, hospitality, tourism, exhibits, education, government, civic, and retail her work is virtually everywhere. As a resident myself of the Village of Merrick Park I have always been inspired by the design, architecture, landscape and culture which is incorporated into this setting. It gives off a feel that suites the city very well while establishing a brand identity that is unique. I was personally inspired by the interior design projects, specifically “Universal Cinema.” The vibrant colors of a California sunset, and an explosion of three-dimensional popcorn transforms the typical “theatre” into an immersive experience. Along with a variety of other work Sussman has created I am intrigued by the overall variety and placement, which pushes the boundaries of graphic design.

- Ashley

Anonymous said...

I also really liked the discussion on the logos. I think Its a very difficult process to create logos since you need to find the right shapes and colors that companies use for their logos. I find it very interesting to look at them because they are mostly unique and they constitute the identity of the company tend to represent.It is through the logo that firms present their thoughts and qualities of their business to people.
Yasemin Koraltan

Diane T said...

One comment you made last class has stood out to me several times this past two weeks and that was how you didn't like the Chevy logo because it was somewhat disproportional or different from the others. It stood out particularly because I dislike Chevy as a manufacturer, but until you pointed that out I never knew why. I caught myself looking at the symbols of other cars and started comparing their logos when I realized that I was judging the car in my head based on how much I liked their logo. Interestingly enough, my favorite type of car is also my favorite logo, the Audi. Its funny how such a small design, a symbol, can have such a huge impact on a person's point of view.

-Diane Trif

Kenny G said...

I really loved the piece at the beginning about the logos. I never realized the power that a logo can have until then. It was interesting to me how time and the consistency of the logo can affect the power of the logo. Particularly, I loved the coke one.

Micole said...

I really enjoy David Carson's work, and I was glad that we got to see a bit of his work in class. David Carson is truIy an influential designer, everytime I see his designs I feel there is something refreshing about them. I am a fan of simplicity, and I also love typography, and I think that very simple typography makes things very elegant, and that is usually the way I like to design, more clean.
However I love David Carson's design, although he is not as simple as I usually like, I feel that his designs break rules, but at the same time deliver the message. I love how he likes to explore with type and images, and it really opens for me a whole new level of design. His designs are always different, and he is not afraid of cutting words, or mixing type, and I think that is something very difficult to do. He manages to create great designs, but still deliver the message clearly, and that is something to admire, especially because his designs are usually very complex.
Micole Alkabes

Nataly G said...

Maybe it’s because I’m a comics rookie and I’ve never had much experience with them besides the Sunday paper, but I had always thought of comics as being humorous or at least lighthearted. I chose to comment on the post about Chris Ware’s comics because I was intrigued that the examples shown were anything but comical.

Unlike the word “comics”, I find that Ware’s work is more like purposeful storytelling often with a heavy undertone. In fact, according to Wikipedia, his works explore themes of social isolation, emotional torment and depression.

One of the examples on the post, “A Feeling/Those People”, a work of his series “Building Stories” (which, by the way, is listed for $5,000) is kind of heavy. As I read the piece, it actually nudged at my emotions and it made me feel slightly uncomfortable because I could tap into the desperation of the main character. I think one reason why this piece and many other of his works affects the viewer, is because he uses themes, problems, and emotions of real life people. I enjoyed getting to know a whole new side of comics that I never knew before.

Nataly Guevara

Irelis Milhet said...

I think Poster Boy is part of a cross-cultural phenomena that always come back in varying styles. Although he is not one of the serious designers (of which there were some amazing talents discussed last class), I don’t think you can ignore this type of designer. Young people are interested in these comments on society. We can see that, for instance, in Banksy and how much of a reaction he gets, even in comments from this class. Poster boy may not being doing these works professionally or in some expensive design program but he’s doing them in real life and I think that’s part of the fun, especially when you can see these works around your city and you are in on the joke, as much as a part of it. I think there will always be an interest in this sort of renegade art- for its messages, its creativity and its forbidden quality. It also feels less like someone is trying to sell you something or get something from you, even if he is selling ideas and probably wants you to either agree or get pissed off. I believe this ties into what we learned about how awesome Polish poster art was during a time where they had nothing to sell. Complete creative freedom can equal awesome artwork that causes a reaction.

Irelis Milhet

Anonymous said...

I found very interesting the importance of a good logo as well as the history of some of the most recognizable trademarks. One might think is easy to make a logo, but I think that what matters the most is how to make that logo very successful to the public and the market is targeting. With so much competition out there, it is very fundamental to establish your name, by creating something so unique yet attractive to the eyes. Some times, all it takes is the simplest shape there is, but that truly identifies and represents your product, something very practical and recognizable to the public.

Yusmary Cortez

Rissa said...

The posts about the posters that can be used as political statements I believe greatly shows the power of design and how it can be used in so many different ways even during this time period. There are so many different mediums in the 21st century that can be used to make a statement. It is great to know that design has transcended time and is still able to be so influential in society.

-Carissa Harris

Anonymous said...

The most interesting thing we learned about in class was definitely the creation of logos. Logos are such a big part of advertising and I think it is so unbelievable because they start as something so small and simple to becoming the face of a company or brand. They become recognizable to just about everyone. I also find how different some logos can be from one another to be extremely interesting. Like for instance pepsi. They're logo is represented all over the world and I'm pretty sure almost anyone could tell you who the logo is a representation of. Also, phone companies logos. At&T and Cingular logos are so different from one another, in yet they are basically for the same thing, just another company, but they are both so different.
- Megan Jacobson

Anonymous said...

Blog post

PhuN said...

I really loved your discussions on logos. So much can be said from a single design. Like you said earlier about IBM, how the logo changed over the years to represent what the company has been striving forward, the future. The Chevy logo does irk me somewhat, i guess they simplistically trying to look like that they were making a logo that matches the general design of the car, fat, heavy, rigid, yet smooth, similarly to how everyone wants to simplify everything nowadays, look at the the design on the page that one would see at posting comments for this blog, very sleek, as compared to the late 90's America online/geocities webpages.

-Phu N.

melisa_nicole said...

This week, I was particularly drawn to the post about Imaginary Forces. The idea that, no matter how we choose to express it, we feel the need to tell some sort of story really intrigued me. After following the link to the Imaginary Forces website, I was even more captivated. I had always noticed seemly simple things like a unique design during movie or television credits, but had never considered it as a story being told. Looking through their work, their work on the credits for the popular show “Mad Men” particularly caught my eye. Being a fan of the show, the unique title sequence immediately drew me in. I had never really seen it as conveying a “mini story” that the show later unfolds. As the writers of Imaginary Forces put it “it became an iconic image of the show: bold, clean, confident, modern and ultimately enigmatic”. Needless to say, after reading this post, I will definitely be looking for the story trying to be told through every title sequence or credit roll in movies and television shows.

-Melisa Ramos

Erin Evon said...

I love looking for logos for inspiration. As any graphic designer knows, a logo encompasses a brand identity with one typeface and perhaps an icon. I love this site for inspiration for brand identity. Today, with all the clutter and expectations from companies, logo design is extremely difficult. I love looking at the classics like Paul Rand’s work, but it’s also nice to see what designers these days are working on. Here is a sight called Creattica showing some of the latest logos I’ve seen that challenge designers and provide a good source for inspiration:

http://creattica.com/logos/latest-designs/

This site also hosts inspiration for Business Cards, Flash Websites, HTML/CSS, Logos, Posters, Photoshop, Advertising, 3D Graphics, Photography, Motion Graphics, Email Design, Mobile Interface, Vector Graphics, Icon Design, Brochures, Book Covers, Tshirt Design among many other categories posted by different designers.

I love the first one, LIT made with a lightbulb and Walk for Green on page 3!

Andrea said...

Coca-Cola is definitely one of the best known companies around the world, and I think the combination of ideogram and logotype in their marketing campaigns has played a large part in that. Since the world doesn’t speak only one language, it’s important to consider all the potential targets and their understanding of the product. Coca-Cola has successfully engrained their logo into our heads, so deeply that we can recognize it just by seeing the signature ribbon wave or the white on red typography.

Examples of other companies that do this combination include but are not limited to McDonalds, Windows, Target, CBS.. New companies being brewed today should consider this strategy as it will expand its market.

Andrea Matute