Saturday, March 26, 2011

Your turn #7

I'm leaving this post open for comments for next week (also, if you have any question regarding next week's midterm exam).

27 comments:

Ashley said...

In terms of the "list of concepts" will the format of that be matching/multiple choice or will we be writing out the definitions?

A.T. said...

matching multiple choice and some true-false questions.

Lisa said...

I was really interested in the Polish poster designs from our last class. For example, Zamecznik’s “Mondo Cane” poster looks so ahead of its time, but could also be seen as a creative poster in today’s design world. The colors and creative use of type in image make it very striking. Wałkuski’s work is also something that stood out to me. His illustrations are definitely disturbing to look at, but I think that is exactly the point of his work. The images he created are very reminiscent of the late-Gothic style, tied in with surrealism, which gives them a completely unique feel. His work is very to the point, breaking all bounds of mystery and presenting this graphic image that could hardly be misinterpreted; yet still held a deeper intellectual meaning. The Polish poster art is something that I had never been exposed to before, so it really inspired me to see the work of these artists.

-Lisa Trucchio

SoFlSunrise said...

I really like Hanna Bodnar’s images. Her shading is what I find most impressive since she uses many different techniques and still maintains a particular style. Sometimes her shading does more than signify a light source. It also creates a rich texture. For example the Czas Milosci poster uses large geometric chunks of shading that have heavy contrast and little gradient. We can’t even see the details of the woman’s eyes. This gives the poster a very dramatic and mysterious theme. The Corka Kapitana poster has a completely different shading technique that incorporates line variation. This woman’s facial features are also geometric, but are outlined. Particularly her jaw, temples, neck and shoulders are made up of thick and thin lines that give her a more fluid depth. A third image, Agnieszka opowiada bajke has a completely different style that uses a combination of both techniques. She uses geometric shapes and contrasted shadows made of lines. Together they give the impression of line variation.

http://www.polishposter.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=1260

-Michelle Roy

Nessx007 said...

I want to start off by saying how much I liked “Laberynth” by Jan Lenica, which I have no doubt is the style that Monty Python borrowed some time later for their animations, but for more comedic purposes.

But I also want to comment on Helen Armstrong’s article about graphic design theory. She mentions that our age, communicating through text and online outlets more than ever, has become dependent on a “template” mentality, whereby we provide our own personalized content, but not without some sort of pre-made guidance. While this may be true for a website like Myspace, where a personalized page is its primary feature, most other social media sites (also being the more successful at the moment) like Facebook or Twitter have little to do with graphic design, as the focus is more on the social aspect. The simple fact is that design is constantly evolving over time, with standards that rise and fall, so I’m not sure if it’s even necessary to develop a comprehensive theory everyone agrees on. This social media revolution of increased communication will no doubt have its influence on a future generation of designers, but that’s what makes it interesting. Creating a theory feels, to me, like trying to protect the art from change. A certain movement of a certain time may have their own set of beliefs about design, but soon enough another movement will come along and turn those on their heads. I say just let graphic design be what it is now, and not to be surprised by its inevitable evolutions in the future.

-Gabriel

Anonymous said...

Wiestaw Waluski work is a stand out for me. Though Waliski’s poster work isn’t aimed at horror films, it has such a whimsical, dark and scary feel; it is all I can think about. Also being a death metal music fan and collector, I can’t even begin to describe the impact that he has on bands and artist making their cover work. The posters he makes for movies and plays seem to describe / explain the movie or show so well, for being so weird, it’s truly amazing how something so imaginative works.

Thomas Engleman

Ernesto Ramirez said...

From last class I really liked Jan Lenica’s weird visions. It’s a very interesting form of polish poster. The fact that it is called “slime-and-gore” period isn’t too surprising considering the way that Jan Lenica put his visions into an image. It’s a very interesting depiction of polish art. It really catches my attention because of the way that he uses curves and mixes in bright colors with dark colors. Even though it is considered the slime and gore period I really don’t see it that way. I see it as a mixture of abstract art with a groovy touch. The way that he uses odd curving forms to create a shape that is depicted is very interesting. I found this website of his: http://www.theartofposter.com/jlenica.htm that shows more of his illustrations. The one that I find the most interesting is Festival d’ Annecy. This illustration is a great combination of odd shapes being able to create an image as well as bright and dark contrasting colors flowing evenly throughout the illustration.

Anonymous said...

I really enjoyed Waldemar Swierzy’s posters designs from the last class. I love how he takes various themes from our culture such as theatre, film, and music and depicts them in such intriguing and innovative designs. His posters really stand out to me because they are entertaining, vibrant, and bursting with energy. I love how the artist incorporates watercolors and crayons into his designs to give his art a very painterly and original quality. In my Contemporary Art class, my professor explained that posters in Poland are considered both a decorative trend as well as fine art. She further explained that Polish poster artists are enthusiastically spoken about and commonly collected. Unlike most posters we see in America, Swierzy’s powerful and colorful posters are engaging and make the viewer want to stop and observe the design. His powerful use of color and the way that his posters explode with vitality has exposed the world to the beauty and influence of poster art.

Lara Rosenbaum

Nicole Ann Collazo said...

What What I found interesting from last week's class was the fact that Polish design flourished during the times that they were suppressed the most. I think it's ironic that when their freedom was being constrained, their imagination was able to create ways of thinking outside the box to get their message across. It was interesting to see the code system they developed and used. I really liked their poster designs because of the fact that despite the fact they were rich in meaning, they were able to show this in a clear and simple manner . Their designs really stood out to me and their influence was clear in other works such as the Cuban posters. It was great to be able to compare works done in the 50's-70's to those which lacked that sort of creativity after the constrains became less around the 1980s.

-Nicole Collazo

Nataly G said...

Like others in the class, I also really enjoyed the Polish posters. I especially like the posters done by Tadeusz Gronowski. Smashing Magazine refers to him as the "Father of the Polish Poster." Gronowski utilized the full range of techniques that were available to him at the time. In fact, his work is among the first to show the transition to a newer tool, the airbrush. The airbrush technique allowed his posters to have softer lines and backgrounds. Gronowski is also one of the first to thoughtfully integrate the use of typography with the illustration. Another signature aspect of his work, one that I personally love, is his tendency to put a touch of humor or lightness in his posters. Two posters that demonstrate this well are called, Artistic Lithography and Ceres Lard (To Die For). I also admire the simplicity, bold and striking shapes, and vivid use of color that characterize many of Gronowski's posters.

Source: Smashing Magazine

Nataly Guevara

Laura Greenberg said...

The Wieslaw Walkuski posters stood out the most to me last week. It's very creepy how he chooses to show the human body. In many of his works, the body is seen in peel-able layers; an underlying structure with putty-like skin stretched over it. Besides a bizarre aesthetic, it creates an uneasy feeling that the subject's identity is a mask for something darker. I think it is fascinating that he uses three-quarter view for a lot of his posters so they look like old-fashioned portrait paintings. He plays on traditions and makes them more interesting. He also is humorous, and has several posters with the characters tongue sticking out. One called Satyrykon is of a jester in three-quarter view whose eyes are covered and who is sticking out his tongue, taunting the audience. This combination of uneasiness and humor makes all of Walkuski's work extremely engaging and explains why he is such a successful artist.

Ashley said...

I find Waldemar Swierzy’s expressionist painting poster style to be inspiring, entertaining, and surreal all at the same time. His optimistic approach is evident through the bubbly and vivid colors used throughout his dynamic approach. The streak/splatter-paint style is definitely one of his trademarks, which sets his works apart from other poster artists. Specifically in his jazz paintings, many of the musicians tend to be a shadow in the background made from black and white paint, while the instruments/music make the overall image pop, almost making the picture come alive and give off a sense of noise/excitement. It is interesting how he incorporates such a wide array of topics specifically mirroring Polish social history; portraits, TV images, music-jazz, artists, and pop art, while still keeping a consistent style through such a vast period of time. From a close up view much of his work is difficult to make out and comes across as overly abstract with lots of lines, shapes, dots, and randomness. Yet when you step back it gives the image a whole new perspective, which becomes legible and clear, giving the picture a whole new meaning.

- Ashley

Anonymous said...

There were so many artists that I wanted to comment on this time but I’ve limited myself to my favorite three.

I’m briefly mentioning Walkuski because his work is so hard to just pass over or not to have an opinion about. It cannot be ignored and it can be recognized very easily because it’s a very specialized style. His work reminds me very much of music videos of such bands as Tool, with its visceral quality and movement, which really brings it to life. I love the jester image that Laura mentioned. It’s dark, funny and twisted. I loved what she noticed of his tendency to use three-quarter view/old fashion portrait. That brought yet another dimension to his work for me.

Zamecznik really looks to me as thought he is designing for today. He uses a great balance of design and type to really capture a point. He keeps this throughout his film posters yet the style of images are pretty varied.

My favorite of all was Swierzy with his overall amazing designs! I love the way he incorporates different mediums depending on what works for his idea. It seems he can do it all. At the same time, I love how the designs are so customized to theme yet are all marked with his particular style. My favorite of his work are the music posters. My main artistic “fetish”, if you will, is contrast between bold colors and muted neutrals and I think he’s a genius at using this contrast to express bursts of energy. This makes all of his pieces so exciting to view and appreciate.

Irelis Milhet

Anonymous said...

I love labyrinth! the unique style, and just all around creepiness that just oozes oozes out from from the scene. I the politically charged animation because I had just recently watched this French animation, "The Fantastic Planet" it too had a surrealistic style of drawing, although there was some voice overs as opposed to the Laberynth, they both had an amazing soundtrack for the animation.

the movie can be found on youtube.

Phu N.

Andrea said...

I somehow always find myself writing about or mentioning architecture (I apologize), but this week’s Design Education Manifesto really hit me. Even if it’s focusing on graphic design, all the things said are true to architectural design as well. Reading point by point is very inspiring and makes me believe I can actually succeed in this profession, because I’ve thought about all these subjects at least once. Time after time I’ve found myself boxed in a design because a professor has an appreciation for a particular style, and after weeks of trying to get my view across and not succeeding I succumb to their direction. Sometimes, the professor isn’t even the problem; instead, I restrict myself from developing an idea because I think it’s just a fake project that will never get built etc., but now I realize I should always take my ideas to their full potential no matter what.

Kenny G said...

Wieslaw Walkusi was a very daring and interesting artist in my opinion. His unique style of showing what's underneath, to me it had more than just a literal meaning. The color choice fits the mood and overall composition of the piece.

Jan Lenica's movie was what teenage slack would vulgarly call a "mind fuck." Forgive the crude wording but that is the first word that came to my mind. It was so captivating and ambiguous with it's use of violins and horns that kept my attention even when I could not understand it all. I did see a bit of the message of temptation, with the bird flying into the room to see the woman and then getting eaten. Overall, it was an interesting class with some art that I would not call my personal choice but intriguing nonetheless.

Rissa said...

I particularly enjoyed your discussion on logos. The section that you posted was very eye opening and the links are fantastic. I am actually in the process of branding my friend's company and receiving a reminder on the aspects that makes a good and stable logo was very encouraging. I believe that it is true that the newer trends in logos are a little more complicated and have a lot more detail. I truly believe that these new designs will not last as long as the simple brands such as ups and abc. I find it very ironic that newer companies are overcomplicating their brands while more established companies are simplifying their logos such as Nike.

-Carissa Harris

alex said...

There is no doubt Waldemar Świerzy's posters are super fun. The combination of acrylics, crayon, and watercolor made his designs so unique and visually intriguing. Aside from the Jimi Hendrix poster we viewed in class, I viewed some of his impressionist jazz posters online because I personally love jazz music. All were unique and colorful and feature tons of jazz greats. It seems as if they made many of these into lithographs over time as well.

-Alex Goldman

Anonymous said...

One of the themes that stood out the most was the transition of the Polish poster and the big influenced it had on the poster history. For instance, I enjoyed the works done by Stefan Norblin. I admired the great use of rich and bright colors, full of energy. The direct message he wants to communicate through his obvious use of imagery. Not to mention the bold typography which compliments his illustrations. I find in some of his pieces, similarities to Cassandre posters. Specially when looking at Gdynia, 1925. It’s amazing how both their works truly show the influence of art deco, with rich colors and striking typography.

Yusmary Cortez

Alyssa Alvarez said...

I was really moved by the Polish posters we discussed, specifically those of Henryk Tomaszewski. the poster "Historia" was the one that moved me the most. the poster was designed to announce the opening of a theatre production on a play that was not discovered until after its author's death. the color and imagery used was a smack in the governments face in a time when censorship was at its highest. the green foot holding up two toes closely resembles a peace sign, and I think it was a way for Tomaszewski to call for peace and a show of "v"ictory. a representation of rising from the dead, just like the play did.

-Alyssa Alvarez

Carolina said...

I was not able to attend class the day we discussed the polish posters and such but since I saw that they impacted so many of my fellow classmates I decided to check them out. I must agree with Lisa that the polish poster by Zamecznik’s “Mondo Cane” definitely does look like a poster that’s ahead of its time; it’s very innovating. Not only is that poster suited for its time period, but could very well be used in our current era. All his posters in my opinion are so simple but have a way of just getting the message out there; it’s very in your face. Wiesław Wałkuski is another artist that really stood out to me. You look at his work and the first thing that comes to my mind is “horror movie”. Its horror, graphic, and in a sense gruesome but so beautifully and brillantly put together.

Carolina Fernandez

Michael said...

Wieslaw Walkuski’s work really stood out from all the images we looked at. Danton really caught my eye with a face of a man, wearing a white wig, and a red hand covered in blood grappling his face. In my own words, this poster means that the face being portrayed is a fake one. The bloody hand represents the person’s own inner being, hence the hand coming out of his chest. Perhaps the body is not content with what the face is doing. Another image that pops out is the rose and the skull. Death, happiness, love, and hate go hand in hand. Love can make you do crazy things and act out of the ordinary. This image does an amazing job of depicting that passion. All the red surrounding the background and rose pedals, then it centers in on the white, pale skull. Walkuski’s work is very dark and somber, but has a lot interpretations and aspects that play into our everyday lives. By far my favorite Polish graphic designer.

Dongo

Micole said...

I was really interested in the discussion of the difference of advertising and propaganda. Advertising is my major and I always found this topic very interesting. I do agree they have their differences, but at the same time I think they have a lot in common, both being means of promotion. As it was said in class, Joseph Goebbels, said that propaganda was active and aimed at the broad masses. I do agree with him on this, I do feel that propaganda has a bigger call to action than regular advertising. Propaganda has a higher purpose and has a more political connotation, that is why it is aimed at the masses, because it is looking for a change in people's mind. Advertising on the other side I feel it does wants an action from you, but it also sometimes just wants to raise awareness, to someday have you buy their product, but it is not as immediate and active as propaganda. Advertising is selling a product, or service, while propaganda us selling a cause or point of view. But I feel that this is the major difference, I don't think that now a days they differ as much. If you see the political campaigns now a days, they advertise in the same medias. Although we might thinks that social media and interactive is more used in advertising, it is now also used in propaganda, specially of the political campaigns of now a days. I think both of the terms also have a time connotation. Propaganda seems more to be a term of the past, and you imagine those old posters, while advertising takes you to today's tv ads, magazines, and interactive media. This might be just me, but its something I have always thought...

Micole Alkabes

melisa_nicole said...

I was particularly drawn to the post about advertising and propaganda this week, not only because I am an Advertising major but also because of the contrast between two seemingly identical things.
Had I been asked before, I would have said that advertising and propaganda are pretty much the same thing. I realized after this post, however, how different they really are which was intriguing to discover. What I found even more intriguing is how their origins can be tied back to forms of government with advertising being a product of Capitalism and propaganda being a product of Totalitarianism. Both after the same purpose, it begs one to question how they can be so strikingly different in origin and intention. Also despite their differences, it is amazing how both have done so much for the commercialism of graphic design efforts.

-Melisa Ramos

Anonymous said...

Out of all of the images we looked at in class, I found Wieslaw Walkuski's work to be the most interesting. His posters were extremely creepy and graphic, but at the same time I couldn't look away. That's what I liked about them. He was one of the only artists that had gory and horrific images, which enabled me to remember his artwork. A lot of the other polish poster designs were all very similar. They were all beautiful and executed amazingly, but not that memorable like Walkuski's work.

- Megan Jacobson

Diane T said...

I noticed my comment for this section still has not posted. What I discussed was basically the impression I was left with after seeing Wiesław Wałkuski's work. His figures, choice of shadowing, colors, and themes, really stand out especially to me because of the finesse horror they express. It is grotesque enough, but not overbearing. His images make me want to know, and repeatedly ask the question of "why" in my head, almost begging for a full story. This may be why he has had such success in creating movie posters.

-Diane

Erin Evon said...

I love the work of Wiestaw Waluski with intricate poster designs that are dark and foreboding. It reminded me of illustrator Graham Smith’s work. Smith is an American Illustrator out of California, and he uses mostly pen and ink but often includes mixed media. His energetic portraits are “brought to life with rich, earthy colors and gritty, organic textures.” You can see his work at www.grahamsmithillustration.com/portfolio

Also, photographer Martin Stranka has a dark and moody style that works well in magazines and advertisements. His work can be seen at www.martinstranka.com He has won a variety of awards including 3rd place in Digital Photographer of the Year Award 2010, First Place at the International Photo Award 2010 International, First place at The Print Space Gallery, International, Finalist for The Icon Price, International, and awarded Best of 20 photographers, Art of Emotion, BLUR magazine, International among many other awards. According to Stephen Pierce, Martin Stranka’s work exists in that space between dreams and waking, those split seconds when a person has a foot in both worlds. Light like the first rays of twilight filtering through a curtain when even the dust seems to glitter with some sort of hidden purpose or meaning. The language of stillness.”