Friday, April 10, 2009

Your turn #10

21 comments:

Lauren said...

Im choosing to comment on Banksy. In my opinion he or they is/are one of the most culturally relevant artists of the day. The fact that he is a "vandalist" and does his graffiti in secrecy is a vital part of his art. In all of his stencils Banksy makes a political statement and puts forth his point of view to the public. The fact that England and other countries have protected his art from being vandalized also makes a point. For some reason all other "art" or graffiti done is punishible by the law and Banksy's art is protected by a plastic sheet bolted into the wall around the piece (Ive seen many in person)as if to protect the very "vandalism" from being vandalized. The fact that he has been able to acheive international recognition and government respect is quite the feat. Also the fact that he or they choose to keep his/their identity a secret gives him street credit with other street artists and the art community. He does it to make a point, and he has been very succesful.

CardM said...

I enjoy anime which are Japanese animations subtitled in English. I decided to watch videos done by Nadi Noda. Es Fat Girl’s reversed my expectations. I was now watching a Japanese girl, speaking perfect English. That catch was that the video is dubbed, Japanese voice over, in Japanese and I cannot understand a damn thing. I was then baffled on whether the poodles were little people in really well done mascot costumes or really poodles. It was surreal. I watched, 1,2,3,4! followed by A small love story about Alex & Juriet. When I got to yuki sentimental, I was speechless. I told the story of a girl through a form of stop motion. He positions girls, who all represent one girl, strategically across a small set. It was as amazing to me as Sagmeister’s coffee cup poster for Adobe/AIGA. This do it yourself approach was very memorable to me by both artist.

Nicky said...

I personally find Banksy's work fascinating. I believe he is one of the great modern day graphic artists, in that he does art for arts sake, using it to make statements about things he disagrees with, and issues cast into the public eye. He loves his work and his anonymity only serves to make him more interesting. He has no interest in notoriety and puts his art out there for public consumption in places where everyone can see it, observe it, and react to it without having to spend a million dollars to have one in their living room. I have seen several of his works in person and the sheer scale and magnitude of the pieces in New York City make me think there are several people working alongside him to craft these pieces almost overnight, unseen.

I have attached the link to a youtube video where Banksy enters a Museum and hangs his own artwork among that of world renowned artists, leaves a small title card, and walks away. He wants people to see his artwork as artwork, and not as a work of art simply because its done by BANKSY.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLuJdB4bS8k

He is also quoted as saying, "the time of getting fame for your name on its own is over. Artwork that is only about wanting to be famous will never make you famous. Any fame is a by-product of making something that means something. You don't go to a restaurant and order a meal because you want to have a sh**."

Elysa D. Batista said...

I enjoyed the work of several different artists this time around. The graphic drawings by Christoph Niemann really caught my eye. The usage of wit in all of his illustrations is completely on target. What I admire the most is that he doesn’t limit his work to one specific style, its flexible to an extent although all his pieces continue to share his humorous insight.

I also found Rene Knip’s ability to create and design the furniture, lighting, and just about EVERYTHING in a space, to be incredible. Given the power to create whatever you feel that the client needs (not the other way around) is insanely liberating as a designer. A common thread throughout Knip’s work is text, I enjoyed being able to see a reflection of the artist in each of his pieces without it having to be the same monotonous thing over and over.

Lastly I want to comment on Blek le Rat and his usage of stencils. Watching the video of his artwork through the years made me realize that when it comes to art, nothing is relatively new and everything has already been done. What IS new is our take on what has been previously achieved and the new meaning we apply to the craft through our message and execution (as the artist called Banksy has done.) This art movement of street art calls to me, there’s something about the rawness and simplicity of a stencil and spray can that cannot be matched. I believe that its the immediacy, and sense of urgency, that manages to evoke the emotion and thoughts targeted. When properly done, it crosses the line of “tagging” to art. Not to say that tagging isn't art, art is expression after all, some just have a purpose while others purpose is to have no purpose.

victoria said...

I lovd Deanne Cheuk's work. I found it especially unique in its combinations of design and illustration and art. It's refreshing to see someone that isn't afraid of molding all forms of mark-making together. It creates a new form of work that is pleasing to the eye of the designer, the illustrator, and just plain everyone. I feel like handmade work always has a little more of a story to it, because the artist is personally involved with the final product. On a computer, the artist's vision still comes to life, but there is something about the simplicity of pen and paper that appeals to me. It's kind of a throwback approach, but it is so beautiful when it is done well. I appreciate the images created by hand because I feel like they remind us that we are still capable of making beautiful pieces without totally relying on machines.

Also, Banksy is wonderful. I have his coffee book called "Wall and Peace" and it is just amazing to see his work. My favorite piece of his is the image of the girl reaching out for balloons that are flying away from her. I always found this piece to be both sad and hopeful. Will she catch the balloons? Did she let them go on purpose?

Taylor Palmer said...

I, too, am fascinated with the work and anonymity of Banksy. He has achieved international recognition by simply letting his artwork speak for himself. He demonstrates the extent to which art can be used to confront political/social/ethical issues through compelling 3-d imagery and identifiable iconography. In one of the few quotes said by Banksy he states, “The thing I hate the most about advertising is that it attracts all the bright, creative and ambitious young people, leaving us mainly with the slow and self-obsessed to become our artists. Modern art is a disaster area. Never in the field of human history has so much been used by so many to say so little.” To an extent, I agree with him. Advertising allures artists because of its moneymaking potential. This same potential seems unattainable, if not non-existent, by most in the art world. Regardless, today’s “modern art” would make some late artists turn in their grave. As a society, we’ve come to accept a simple black dot as art if put in the correct context. While I am one to often defend this type of “art”, Banksy makes a good point: the stark simplicity of some modern-day art eliminates the story (or message) that is often conveyed through visual imagery. Art then becomes not a means of communicating, but rather a multitude of random, insignificant images/objects that show no relevance and have no meaning.

scolbert said...

I too am intrigued by Banksy's work. His ideas are completely innovative and amazing. They really touch on sociopolitical issues in an original way that involve the audience spectators. Banksy's pieces are more than just mere tags so its understandable that England is protective of the significant works. Though i would love for him to partake in interviews I understand that the air of mystery he has about him is what makes him and the production of his works so interesting.

In addition, I love Martin Wootli's work. Its beautiful and vibrant and makes me want to look at his work all day. He has not conformed to ordinary advertising world, but instead used his talent to create a unique graphic art form. to He's found the perfect combination of color and linear usage. His posters are such as the one for Museum fur Gestaltung Zurich is a perfect example. Using complementary and primary colors with 3-d text against an explosion of cloud forms somehow becomes completely dynamic and complete.

Ashley said...

Naohiro Ukawa’s work definitely makes you feel like you’re on drugs when you look at both posters and videos. There is so much to look at; you don’t know where to start. It’s maybe too much of an explosion of color but I still liked the pieces on the website. However the video link I looked at made me nauseous. After looking on youtube I did find one by Naohiro called Bordem Vision Creation Newsun(link below) that I loved!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sPxde77NRE

I liked Deanne Cheuk’s mixed media art. The way in which the negative space was used brought out the whole image wonderfully. The mushrooms were a little odd but very mythical. I read Cheuk’s website and apparently the mushrooms are part of series called The Mushroom Girls Virus Book that emphasizes edible mushrooms. Strange but beautiful.

Kara D said...

I really liked TOKO's work. They are strong both on the conceptual end and on the execution end. They aim to keep the work they do for their clients unique, which I think is important in an environment where we are bombarded with images as much as we are today. It's important for the images you create to stand out against the rest of the clutter.

TOKO takes on both large and small projects, which I think indicates that they take on projects that they love and are inspired by creatively. If they were in it for the money or the fame they would only take on huge corporations whose campaigns would compete in the global market.

They do print work, but don't limit themselves to just poster or just magazine or just identity design as many designers do. They work with all three of those medias in addition to signage, environmental graphics, editorial, book, concept, poster, flyer and invitation surfaces. That makes me think that they work hard to think outside of the box and don't allow their work to become calculated and repetitive

Mostly what draws me to them I think is their typographic work. They say that typography does more than just get information across, and I couldn't agree more.

Annika said...

Working chronologically, I thought I'd start by saying that I really like the works posted by Deanne Cheuk. They definitely aren't the usual pieces I'd be drawn to, but I really enjoy the visually mixed techniques in the one of hands holding mushrooms and the female faces amongst scenes from nature. The mushroom one was very reminiscent of Julie Taymor's film, "Across the Universe". It may not be an Oscar-winning movie, but ATU is absolutely one of my favorites when it comes to the bizarrely intriguing and very surreal visuals. I too must comment on the work of Banksy. When I was in Europe this summer, I saw many walls with similar artworks on them and simply thought they were cool-looking. Now, however, I wonder if they were legitimately done by Banksy or just by an imitator. Either way, I love the way in which spunky bits of glorified graffiti can evoke a political thought or simply bring a smile to my face. My favorite would have to be Banksy's Space Girl and Bird. It's so bizarre and yet cute, including the pink spraypaint heart above her head. I wish there was more graffiti like this on the streets of Miami, not just random tags.

http://www.artofthestate.co.uk/Banksy/Banksy_Heart.htm

Emily said...

I especially liked Deanne Cheuk’s designs, and her ability to fluently mix many forms of media. However, when Victoria says that she uses a unique combination of design, illustration and art, well I think illustration is art, and art is of course design. So rather, I believe that she uniquely combines different methods of design, allowing watercolor, oils, pen, pencil, software, etc. to work together to form a fluid, coherent whole despite the drastically different medias. Her use of many different media, vibrant colors, confusing subjects and kaleidoscopic forms results in very psychedelic artwork that is not only experimental, but also extremely appealing. Therefore, in response to Ashley’s comment, I do not believe that the mushrooms serve a mythical purpose. Mushrooms, or shrooms in this case are hallucinatory, and in Cheuk’s artwork, they emphasize the psychedelic nature of her mixed media designs.

A great video of Cheuk discussing her designs:
http://www.zoom-in.com/design/designing-minds/the-creative-backstory-deanne-cheuk

Nicole Severi said...

My new favorite from this latest post was the work by Christoph Niemann. I honestly could have stared at his portfolio for hours. The pieces are so creative yet simple and clean. I feel like a lot of artists go too far in their creativity to a point where it gets messy and too hard to even appreciate the imaginative effort anymore. For example, the toothbrush pieces are entertaining and truly creative without going overboard.

I also really like the two pieces under his "Various II" category (numbers 044 and 045). The businessman lying in the grass being mowed by the lawn mower is genius. It's such a simple concept but it is done so well and makes such a cool statement.

This same type of art is seen with Banksky. I've seen his work before and always thought it was really eyecatching, because it's also very simple but really well thought out. The piece where the maid is lifting up the curtain on the wall is just great; he has such attention to detail, and to have done all of it in secret under short time constraints makes it even more impressive. The double-yellow lines turning into a flower is so basic but looks so cool. I hope someday my designs can have a similar feel.

Ryan Eckert said...

I liked the designs made by Deanne Cheuk. Her ability to make a coherent piece of art with different types of medias is impressive. She is able to create pieces that have a flow and match the style of each different medium. I had an assignment in one of my graphic design classes that required us to make a poster using 3 different mediums to bring one piece together. I decided to use hand drawn, collage, and paint my poster; it didn’t come anywhere close to the fluidity of Cheuk’s designs.
Cheuk has incorporated nature and human figure into her designs. Many of the illustrations that she creates are psychedelic. Her most recently published book “Mushroom Girls Virus” depicts different female figures with mushrooms. She claims that the book takes an emphasis on the varieties of edible fungi. If it isn’t obvious through her designs, Cheuk has had a “trip” that may have given her the inspiration she needed to create some of this work.

Michelle Siegel said...

Out of the collection of designers Arem Duplessis and Deanne Cheuk both really caught my eye. In both their work I really love how they are able to combine different mediums so effortlessly in order to make a successful piece. Since I’m working on that currently in design class, I really admire artists that are able to find solutions in interesting ways.

Duplessis’s top piece, the play off the Rembrandt-like portrait, I found most captivating. The amount of colors he uses, especially not expected ones considering the topic, is really amazing. Furthermore the way he uses those colors to incorporate the topography is really done in an interesting way. I think the depth he is able to create between the head, text, and hand, really creates drama in the piece as well.

Even though Cheuk doesn’t use any text, she is able to combine different mediums in order to create very surreal pieces. Instead of seeing surrealism just through paint from artists like Dali, I think she adds an extra layer of abstraction by using paint and illustration. Not only are her topics surreal, but creating this skewed perspective into space it really takes the work further.

Emily said...

I also found Rene Knip’s combination of typography and architecture very impressive. His letters are not separate from his architectural or environmental designs; they are part of the design. His letters are integrated into the physical material of the building, including his signage. His typographic and vernacular aesthetics are right on target, as are his constructivist aesthetics. When the two are combined, Knipp forms a new method of design in which the environment is part of his lettering and his lettering is part of the environment, a truly incredible result.

I’d also like to comment on Martin Woodtli’s designs, agreeing with Scolbert in that “he has not conformed to the ordinary advertising world.” Clearly, Woodtli has developed his own form of graphic art. His proficiency in computer programs is unmatched. Computer technology poses zero limitations on Woodtli, his level of skill allows him to be 100% uninhibited, and this shows in his designs. He makes use of every possibility that computer technology has to offer, enabling him to produce these extremely detailed and dynamic 3D graphic designs in which every time one looks back at them, amazing new details are seen. They are even somewhat psychedelic like Cheuk’s designs, or somewhat explosive for lack of a better word.

Lizzy said...

I have always enjoyed the work of Banksy. I find it very interesting how he has brought public graffiti to the next level. I really like the sarcasm and satire he uses to communicate to the public on issues involving politics and culture. The street art he creates is not made for any commercial galleries or for profit, it is simply there to be “art.” The fact that Banksy creates his work quickly and out of sight allows the art to stand alone without distraction and influence of the artist (and besides the point that graffiti on public property is usually considered vandalism). I find it interesting that members of the campaign “Keep Britain Tidy” have even said "we are concerned that Banksy's street art glorifies what is essentially vandalism," because I think that is exactly what has been done.

Another post that stood out to me was the one on Nagi Noda. I really like the first video with the “eyes” dancing. At first you see simply two people dancing, then it all changes when the glasses appear. But initially, this video reminded me of a popular video on YouTube right now.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLYD_-A_X5E

I also think the Coca Cola commercial directed by Nagi Noda is unique and visually pleasing. It captures elements of stop-action film, but with real people who each move, even if it is just a sway of the arm. Check it out.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKGw_KYH63k

Tia Hendricks said...

I truly enjoyed Banksy's work. I think that he is truly a creative artist and his work speaks profoundly about his artistic abilities. He is an inspiration to modern day artists. I think it is quite amazing that his work is always very intricate and detailed. More than that, I think it is incredible that he has yet to be caught considering the size of his works. His opinion on situations is evident in his artwork. Each piece is well thought out and strategically crafted. The fact that his pieces have gained significant credibility and are worth a substantial amount of money speaks volumes of his work. His work is driven by strong beliefs and as a result he is a wonderful and inspirational artist. I think he has created a new era for graffiti.

Lizzy said...

Triff, here is my post from last Wednesday that I was unable to post because I was observing Passover. It is a comment on the Adbusters magazine..
Our current society seems to be driven by consumerism. Everywhere we go, logos, ads and commercials are constantly in our faces. These days there are numerous ways we communicate information (radio, television, internet, billboards, clothing, posters, magazines, newspapers, etc), and with all of these advancements in technology, there is almost no way to get away from it all. That is why I think Adbusters is so interesting. I enjoy the way they use juxtaposition to poke fun at society. Personally, I think that “Buy Nothing Day” and “TV Turnoff Week” are such great ideas because they give people a chance to really look back at our society from a different view. We live in such a fast-paced world where everything is at our fingertips, and I think it can be beneficial to just take a break from it all. Last month, I did not have the internet working at my house and in a way it was a relief. I seemed to cherish the time I had reading my books and hanging out with friends. Of course I am used to checking my mail numerous times a day and keeping in touch with friends and family on Facebook, but taking time off made me realize how dependent some of us really are. I can remember when we first got our first cell phone to share with the whole family, and now everyone including nine-year-olds carry their cell phones constantly at their sides. It is great how our world can be so connected, but we must not get sucked into it, believing it is the basis of life. We need to look around and appreciate the simple things that are the core of our society. That’s why I think Adbusters is an eye-opening magazine that really does benefit the advancement of the “new social activist movement of the information age.”

Magdalena said...

I really like Deanne Cheuk art. The great mixture of design, art and illustration. The work with mushroom is really impressive and brings this very dream like mood. it calls to subconscious and I would say even drugs like feelings. I'm impressed with the connection he's making in between graphics and illustration, color and black and white and just outlines. All this makes the pieces so unique and interesting.
I also admire Banksy. His/ their work is exquisite. Pure genius with the ideas he's got and the social issues he represents in them. It makes you think of it as an art and not anymore vandalism that some might call.

Jessica said...

Banksy's art is truly sight-defying. His artwork ranges from intricate paintings to more simple, yet symbolic, styles. More incredible, however, is his concept of using man-made structures as his canvas. His artwork bends the reality of our concrete environment tricking us into genuinely believing the existence of something that isn't really there. His art, displayed within urban jungles, provides a welcomed break from the monotony of city surroundings. He incorporates the presence of walls, builldings, and streets to produce pieces of art that actually use their canvas as a source for their own contexts. Banksy's art is predominantly satirical in nature and the mystery behind him as an individual greatly lends to his guerilla-style of art (usually graffiti-based). I tremendously appreciate his form of art and enjoy the idea of using unconventional mediums for artwork as Banksy does so brilliantly.

pais said...

i think that tom gauld is a wonderful artist. I really enjoy his sketch like quality of many of his images, the fact that he uses ink is another reason why i really enjoy him. A lot of his work reminds me of the CD art that was done for some of the older radiohead albums.
many people decided to comment on banksy. I understand why. i like that he does most of his work in secret, while people try to keep his work up and not get it taken down is a strong statement as well. i prefer the graffiitti artist who remains confidential, because that is the origination of graffitti.
regardless, any artist that can make a statement that changes peoples ideas, creates controversy, and can get a reaction out of someone has done good in my book. As long as it is for the benefit, goodness, and positivity in the world.

(this is my post, (paisley) , my computer was accidentally logged into my friends account .